HMS Warrior at the Portsmouth Navy dockyard at sunset after listening to the pipes and drums whilst watching the lowering of the standard walk back towards the hard and took this shot, wish it had been a vertorama, but hindsight is such a wondrful thing. HMS Warrior more..... (Mr J G Woracker)

HMS Warrior at the Portsmouth Navy dockyard at sunset after listening to the pipes and drums whilst watching the lowering of the standard walk back towards the hard and took this shot, wish it had been a vertorama, but hindsight is such a wonderful thing.

Buy or Download  this image from my portfolio site, click the cart and then follow the instructions

Buy or Download this image from my portfolio site, click the cart and then follow the instructions

 

 

 

 

 

A little bit of history
Warrior was designed and built in response to an aggressive French shipbuilding programme which saw the introduction of the first iron-clad warship La Gloire designed by the brilliant naval architect Stanislas Charles Henri Dupuy de Lome.
Put up for sale as scrap in 1924, no buyer could be found, and so, in March 1929 she left Portsmouth to be taken to Pembroke Dock and converted into a floating oil pontoon, re-named again as Oil Fuel Hulk C77. By 1978, she was the only surviving example of the ‘Black Battlefleet’ – the 45 iron hulls built for the Royal Navy between 1861 and 1877.

As a pivotal Royal Naval ship, Warrior had not been forgotten. In 1967 people first started to talk about restoring Warrior. Prominent in this campaign was John Smith, at the time MP for the Cities of London and Westminster, who had formed the Manifold Trust five years earlier to restore threatened items of our national heritage

Sir John Smith agreed that the Manifold Trust would underwrite the cost of restoration, estimated between £4-8 million, and the ship was handed over to the Maritime Trust in 1979.

Warrior was towed 800 miles to Hartlepool where the world’s largest maritime project ever undertaken then began.

HMS Warrior read more at…..